Awards' Guidelines

Absi Awards' Guidelines Archive include illustrated articles and guidelines to make your awards' purchasing experience more fulfilling. It includes articles about Absi Awards and Recognition Systems covering: Absi Medals, Absi Trophies, Absi Plaques, and Absi Personalized Gifts and Mementos. We hope that this wiki will be eventually developed into a reference about the subject matter.
All information is given in good faith but without warranty. Freedom from patent rights must not be assumed.

Using Absi e-showcase

posted Feb 19, 2015, 11:45 PM by Abdallah Absi

Specifications of Key Medals

posted Jan 24, 2014, 12:14 AM by Abdallah Absi

Specifications of Key Medals

General

A key fob or key medal is a generally decorative and at times useful item many people often carry with their keys, on a ring or a chain, for:

  • Ease of tactile identification

  • Provide a better grip

  • To make a personal statement.

Key fobs are also known as a "Key Ring" or "Key Chain" in colloquial usage.


Key Chain

A keychain or key chain is a small chain, usually made from metal, that connects a medal to a keyring. The length of a keychain allows an item to be used more easily than if connected directly to a keyring.


Key Ring

A keyring is made to hold keys and is usually made of metal. Keyrings are usually connected to keychains.


Specifications & Features

Standard key medals have the following specifications and features:


Available sizes of our standard key medals (weights include key ring, chain and box):

size

Medal Size (mm)

Weight (gm)

A

40

78

B

35

71

C

30

64

All dimensions and weights are approximate.


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THESAURUS of AWARDS TERMS

posted Jan 24, 2014, 12:10 AM by Abdallah Absi

January 2014 - Recycled Papers from Absi Co


THESAURUS of AWARDS TERMS

  • ability – talent, intellect, aptitude, propensity, inclination

  • accomplishment – fulfillment, completion, achievement, realization, attainment, triumph, victory, success, consummation

  • achievement – attainment, accomplishment, consummation, realization, triumph success

  • appreciation – thankfulness, gratefulness, obliged, indebted, gratitude, regard, esteem, respect

  • assistance – support, aid, help, to serve, collaborating with, contribution

  • assistant – aide, helper, acolyte, friend, associate, colleague, second in command, patron, backer, ancillary, adjutant, partner, co-worker, ally

  • beautiful – lovely, attractive, comely, pretty, elegant, superb, grand, handsome, radiant, ravishing, gorgeous

  • beloved – loved, adored, worshiped, cherished, dear, favorite, precious, treasured, darling, endeared, valued

  • best – finest, highest, first, premium, crowning, incomparable, greatest, top-notch, unequaled, choice

  • carefully – conscientiously, exactly, rigidly, precisely, fastidiously

  • ceremony – function, commemoration, memorial, rite, ritual, pageant, observance

  • certify – guarantee, attest, confirmed, endorse, assure

  • commend  praise, laud, eulogize, recommend, glorify, extol,entrust

  • continued – sustained, perseverance, perpetual, sanctioning, enduring, on-going, unrelenting, extended

  • contribution – endowment, commitments, donation, sharing, supplying, present, bestowal, charity

  • cooperation – collaboration, participation, alliance, assistance, team-work, concurrence

  • dedication – devotion, efforts, untiring efforts, commitment

  • dependable – trustworthy, mainstay, anchor, confidant, patron, reliable, faithful, loyal, unfailing, true

  • determination – resolution, certainty, persistence, conviction, steadfastness, perseverance, intransigence

  • develop – extend, expand, advance, promote, build, enrich, cultivate

  • diligent – zealous, energetic, vigorous, undeviating, assiduous, unremitting, intense, industrious, persistent

  • distinguished – illustrious, venerable, renowned, honored, celebrated, esteemed, remarkable, outstanding, great, extraordinary

  • education – edification, enrichment, teaching, instruction, enlightenment, tutelage, knowledge

  • effort – endeavor, labor, work, undertaking, venture, task commitment, exertion

  • emphasis – underline, dramatize, pronounce, accentuate, underscore, punctuate

  • enduring – lasting, permanent, surviving, continual, unchanging, uninterrupted, tenacious, perennial, tolerating

  • establish – institute, found, formulate, construct, organize, inaugurate, start, bring about

  • excellent – magnificent, supreme, peerless, foremost, exemplary, desirable, paramount, superior, superlative, exceptional, tremendous, wonderful

  • friendship – association, brotherhood, companionship, confidant

  • give – grant, bestow, confer, impart, present, award, convey, contribute to, lavish upon

  • guidance – direction, leadership, supervision, management, oversight, suggestion, counsel

  • happy – joyous, merry, convivial, congenial, mirthful, charmed, spirited

  • instill – infuse, impress, inspire

  • involvement – link, connection, participation, affiliation, commitment

  • judgment – knowledge, discrimination, understanding, perception, acuteness, keenness, intuition

  • kindness – good intentions, consideration, helpfulness, indulgence, courtesy, thoughtfulness, altruism, graciousness

  • leadership – administration, authority, foresight, command, supremacy

  • noble – honorable, heroic, brilliant, excellent, princely, magnanimous, courtly, dignified, splendid, exalted, distinguished

  • outstanding – notable, distinguished, highly regarded, impressive, worthy, considerable, enthusiastic

  • patience – forbearance, fortitude, composure, endurance

  • praise – applaud, cheer, acclaim, endorse, eulogize, admire

  • presented – awarded, bestowed, conferred, given, endowed, delivered

  • profit – benefit, thrive, prosper, gain

  • promote – advance, forward, encourage, expand, nourish, improve, bolster

  • recognition – in acknowledgement of, remembrance, acknowledgement, commendation

  • respect – esteem, honor, regard, admiration

  • retirement – withdrawal, resignation, departure

  • service – assistance, cooperation, performance of duty, help, servitude

  • sincerely – truthfully, honestly, earnestly, genuinely, profoundly

  • special – exceptional, distinctive, unusual, unique, exclusive, extraordinary

  • support – upkeep, responsibility for, provide, promote, sustain, further, maintain, patronize, subsidize

  • thanks – appreciation, gratefulness, acknowledgement, gratitude




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What to Say When Accepting an Award?

posted Jan 24, 2014, 12:08 AM by Abdallah Absi

January 2014 - Recycled Papers from Absi Co



What to Say When Accepting an Award?


Award shows are known for not only the performances, celebrity outfits and the glamour, but also the award acceptance speeches. While you may not be attending the Oscars or Grammys any time soon, you may attend an award ceremony at your job, school, or other organization, and be required to give an acceptance speech. A good speech garners respect from the audience, while a bad one may put people to sleep or confuse them.[1]

Extracts from Business Communication for Success [2]

If you are the award recipient, be aware that the acceptance of an award often provides a moment of influence on the audience that can serve to advance your position or cause. Use of the limelight is an important skill, and much like any speech or presentation, it requires planning and preparation. You don’t want to be caught speechless, and you want to project a professional presence that corresponds to the award or recognition.

If you know you are being considered for an award, first consider what the award recognizes within your professional community. An award is a symbol of approval, recognition, or distinction that honors the recipient in public. As the recipient, it is your role to convey recognition of that honor with your gracious acceptance.

Perhaps you have seen an awards ceremony on television, where a producer, composer, actor, or musician has received public recognition. Sometimes the acceptance unifies the community and serves as an inspiration to others. Other times the recipient stumbles, talks as fast as they can to list all the people who helped them reach their goal (often forgetting several, which can hurt feelings), or they use the spotlight to address an unrelated issue, like a political protest. They may mumble, and their nervousness may be so obvious that it impacts their credibility. Accepting an award is an honor, an opportunity, and a challenge.

The first step in accepting an award is to say thank you. You can connect with the audience with your heartfelt emotional displays and enthusiasm. Raised arms, clasped hands, and a bow are universal symbols of respect and gratitude. Note that rambunctious displays of emotion such as jumping up and down or large, sweeping gestures are better left for the athletic fields. An award ceremony is a formal event, and your professionalism will be on display for all to see.

Next, you should consider giving credit where credit is due, noting its relevance to your field or community. If you name one person, you have to be sure to not leave anyone out, or you run the risk of hurting feelings and perhaps even making professional enemies. If you confine your credit list to a couple of key people, it is wise to extend the credit beyond the individual mentions by saying something like, “There are so many people who made this possible. Thank you all!” You should link your response to the award organization and your field, industry, or business. Don’t apologize or use terms that can be interpreted as negative. The acceptance of an award is a joyous, uplifting affair, and your role is to maintain and perpetuate that perception.

You may also consider linking your award to a motivational anecdote. A brief, personal story about how a teacher or neighbor in your community motivated you to do better than you thought you could and how you hope this can serve to motivate up-and-coming members to strive for their very best, can often stimulate an audience. Don’t exaggerate or stretch the story. The simple facts speak for themselves and the award serves as a powerful visual aid.

Say “thank you again” as you leave the stage, facilitating the transition to the next part of the ceremony while acknowledging the honor. You may need to take note where previous recipients have exited the stage to proceed without error, or simply return to your seat. Your brief comments combined with a graceful entrance and exit will communicate professionalism.

Check List by Toastmasters International [3]

Accepting an award graciously requires thought and preparation. Saying "Thanks, but I really don’t deserve this" won’t cut it. These tips might help:

  • Write your acceptance speech as a script and memorize it.

  • Practice, Practice, Practice. Rehearse with a timer and allow time for the unexpected.

  • Pause, smile and count to three before saying anything.

  • Begin by addressing the audience to buy some time and calm your nerves.

  • Don’t apologize for anything. The audience is rooting for you.

  • Control filler words (uhms and ahs ).

  • Concentrate on your message, not the medium.

  • Keep names to a minimum and pronounce them correctly.

  • Make your last line expendable in case you are cut off.

Instructions to Prepare an Award Ceremony Speech [1]

  1. Decide ahead of time who will speak if multiple people are part of the potentially winning entity. Either pick one person or decide how long each person may speak.

  2. Make a list of every person you need to thank, such as your family, partners, mentors and other people. You may not have time to thank everyone, so it’s okay to sum up groups, such as “my family” or your marketing team at your place of employment.

  3. Say concisely what the award means to you. Show genuine thanks and appreciation, but do so in a few words. Example: “Ever since I started medical school, I knew this award was something to strive for.”

  4. Ask someone associated with the award ceremony what the time constraints are for an acceptance speech. If he is unsure of a set time, err on the side of keeping the speech brief, such as a minute or less.

  5. Write out the speech. Do not write out every single word, but instead key remarks and people to thank. Type the speech and print it in a font that’s large and easy to read. Make the speech concise and genuine. Avoid showboating or using the moment as an opportunity to push another agenda or your political views.

  6. Practice your speech multiple times. You may get nervous when presenting the speech, so practicing helps you feel comfortable and not forget your words.

  7. Give the speech at the ceremony, breathing normally and making eye contact with the audience at least every two or three sentences. Speak confidently into the microphone, smile and act thankful, without coming off as cocky.


1. How to Give an Award Ceremony Speech By Chris Brower, eHow Contributor
2. Business Communication for Success, v. 1.0 by Scott McLean
3. Notes from Toastmasters International - Tips for Special Occasions


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What to Say When Presenting an Award?

posted Jan 24, 2014, 12:05 AM by Abdallah Absi

January 2014 - Recycled Papers from Absi Co


What to Say When Presenting an Award?


At some point in your life, you’ll probably have the opportunity to formally reward someone for a job well done. When you do this in front of others it increases the perceived value of the honor. When presenting an honor or award, you need to accomplish two things:

  • Highlight the award

Make sure that the recipient, as well as the audience understand the importance of the award. What does it stand for? How does someone earn it? What are the traditions associated with this honor?

  • Highlight how the person earned the award

Now that you’ve built up the award, you need to build up the person receiving it. What did this person do to deserve the award? How did they meet the criteria better than anyone else who was up for the award?

There are ways to make this sort of presentation more effective.[5]

Extracts from Business Communication for Success [2]

There is nothing more gratifying than recognition from your peers and colleagues for a job well done. We all strive for acceptance, and recognition is a reflection of belonging, a basic human need. In the following paragraphs we will discuss how to present an award tactfully, graciously, and professionally.

First, make sure that you have all the information correct before you get up to speak: the honoree’s correct name and how it is pronounced, the correct title of the award, and the details about the honoree’s accomplishments that you are about to share. The spotlight will be on you, and your accurate delivery will be crucial to the happiness of the occasion.

When presenting an award, the key is to focus attention on the honor and the person receiving it—not on yourself. You may have been part of the committee that chose the winner, or involved in some other way, but your role should never upstage that of the person being honored.

You can focus the attention on the recipient in two ways: surprise or direct acknowledgement. In the surprise approach, you mention characteristics of the person receiving the award without initially mentioning their name—allowing the audience to start guessing who it might be. You may mention a list of accomplishments, or perhaps a positive story. With the surprise approach, you share the information that is sure to reveal the recipient’s identity right before you present the award.

You may prefer, however, a direct acknowledgement of the honoree’s performance or service and simply announce his or her name. The direct acknowledgement approach is typically followed by the reasons for choosing this person to receive the award, or include his or her past accomplishments. This direct strategy may be preferred if the audience is not familiar with the recipient.

Check List by Toastmasters International [3]

When recognizing someone for a job well done, highlight the value of both the award and the recipient. To create a memorable presentation, explain the criteria for the award and how the recipient met those criteria. Here are a few guidelines:

  • Tell a story about the significance of the award.

  • Pronounce the recipient's name correctly.

  • Provide background on the recipient.

  • Hold the award respectfully and hand it to the recipient as if it were a treasure.

  • Wait to invite the recipient to the lectern until you formally introduce them.

  • Stand so that the audience can clearly see you, the recipient and the award.

Instructions to Present an Award [1]

Awards’ ceremonies are special occasions. If you're the one doing the presenting, a little planning can make the moment even more meaningful. Whether you're hosting a large ceremony or presenting the award by teleconference, keep in mind a few tips to make it a thoughtful success. Read on to learn how to present an award.


  1. Order the award in plenty of time. Start shopping for the award early and discuss turnaround time with the vendor. Allow enough leeway to return the award if it is not correct and get a replacement.

  2. Plan the presentation. Whether you are inviting many people and having a formal ceremony or just a small get-together, attend to the details well in advance. Consider where the event will take place, what kind of attire will be worn, what kind of food or refreshments will be served and how many will be invited.

  3. Notify the media. Newspapers reserve a special section for awards and presentation news. They will come as a guest to the award presentation or they will lend you a news camera and ask you to take a photo and provide the details. Assign someone to snap the photo when you are handing the award to the recipient.

  4. Practice your speech. Take some time to write down what you want to say and rehearse it in front of the mirror, watching how you look and move. When you're ready, present it to family and friends for their reaction. Allow enough time to make any necessary changes and rewrites. Videotaping your speech is an excellent way for you to assess the aspects of your talk that need work.

Ideas for an Award Speech [4]

Presenting an award is almost as much of an honor as receiving it. Awards are a tangible symbol of recognition for an accomplishment or a job well-done. Presenting or accepting an award may be an honor, but coming up with a speech is a challenge. Consider some ideas for an award speech to assure that special moment won't be overshadowed by a tongue-tied presentation or a faux pas.

Humor

Some people are intimidated when given the task of speaking in public. Use a joke or story to lighten the mood and to put both the speaker and audience at ease. Your joke could be as simple as a one liner found in a book or can be a good-natured jab at the speaker himself. Avoid off-colored humor that is sexiest, racist or potentially offensive to anyone in the audience. Short and humorous stories about the speaker's children or pet is something a lot of people can identify with.

Explanation

Both an award presenter and the the person who receives the award should have a solid knowledge of the significance of the award. The presenter should give details about how the winner was selected and about why winning the award is a worthwhile honor. For instance, a presenter could tell the audience that the winner was chosen out of a group of 100 potential nominees. A presenter should explain that the award was given to the winner because she made the most sales or met her goals or because she was voted on by her peers. The recipient of the award should detail why he feels so honored to win the award and recognize the accomplishments of the other nominees.

Introduction

A presenter should introduce himself as soon as he steps to the podium. He should give his name, position and why he is presenting the award to establish credibility. Establishing credibility is important, as it helps the audience to understand why the presenter was chosen for the task. For instance, the presenter might be an expert in the same career field as the award recipient and therefore knows the person and her accomplishments first hand. A presenter may be a personal friend of the recipient or even a fellow nominee for the award. A presenter should also introduce the winner of the award by giving background information about him for those in the audience who may not be familiar with the winner.

Other Ideas for an Award Speech

Use photo slides and other props as visuals during an award speech. Show pictures of past winners of the awards or some of the current winner's significant accomplishments. Refer to the photos in a speech to help the audience follow along.

An acceptance speech should include a message of thanks. A recipient should thank parents, spouses, children, co-workers, mentors, bosses and colleagues. Other people to thank include corporate sponsors and other award nominees.

Tips for effectively presenting an award [5]

Tell a story

People are more engaged with stories. So highlight the award and the honoree in the form of a story.

Introductions first

Call on the awardee last … nothing is more awkward than having to stand there and wait while you do your presentation. Tell your story first, then, when you are ready to hand over the award, call the awardee up to the lectern.

Mind your Ps and Qs

Make sure that you know how to pronounce the name of the award and the person receiving it. Also, make sure your facts are correct. Nothing will spoil the honor more than mispronouncing someone’s name or announcing information that is totally wrong.

Be humble

You may have been on the selecting committee, but this presentation is about the person being honored … not you. The presentation should be mostly about how wonderful the honoree is and why they are so deserving of this honor.

Demonstrate the award’s worth

Hold the award as if it were a treasure. Make eye contact with the recipient, smile warmly and hand over the award with reverence.

You can focus the attention on the recipient in two ways: surprise or direct acknowledgement. In the surprise approach, you mention characteristics of the person receiving the award without initially mentioning their name—allowing the audience to start guessing who it might be. You may mention a list of accomplishments, or perhaps a positive story. With the surprise approach, you share the information that is sure to reveal the recipient’s identity right before you present the award.

You may prefer, however, a direct acknowledgement of the honoree’s performance or service and simply announce his or her name. The direct acknowledgement approach is typically followed by the reasons for choosing this person to receive the award, or include his or her past accomplishments. This direct strategy may be preferred if the audience is not familiar with the recipient.

1. How to Present an Award By eHow Contributor
2. Business Communication for Success, v. 1.0 by Scott McLean
3. Notes from Toastmasters International - Tips for Special Occasions

4. Ideas for an Award Speech By Stephanie Kelley, eHow Contributor

5. Public speaking super powers. Carma Spence



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Awards and Certificates Titles

posted Jan 23, 2014, 11:57 PM by Abdallah Absi

December 2013 - Recycled Papers from Absi Co

Awards and Certificates Titles

  • Award of Gratitude

  • Achievement Award

  • Bronze Sales Achievement Award

  • Silver Sales Achievement Award

  • Gold Sales Achievement Award

  • Platinum Sales Achievement Award

  • Boss of the Year

  • Certificate of Achievement

  • Employee of the Year

  • Employee of the Month

  • For Unselfish Devotion

  • For Distinguished Service

  • For Excellence

  • For Outstanding Service

  • For Outstanding Performance

  • Founders Award

  • Hi-Average

  • Hi-Series

  • Hi-Score

  • In Loving Memory of

  • In Memory of

  • In Appreciation of

  • In Recognition of 25 Years

  • In Grateful Recognition of

  • Leader Award

  • Merit Award

  • Million Dollar Club

  • Most Improved

  • Most Valuable Player

  • Outstanding Achievement Award

  • Outstanding Leadership Award

  • Outstanding Salesmanship

  • Outstanding Student Award

  • Presented to

  • Presidents Award

  • Retirement Award

  • Recognition of Excellence

  • Safety Award

  • Sales Achievement Award

  • Sales Leader Award

  • Top Performance

  • Top Sales Award

  • Top 10 Distributor

  • Tournament Champion

  • 1st Place -or- First Place

  • 2nd Place -or- Second Place

  • 3rd Place -or- Third Place

  • 4th Place -or- Fourth Place

  • #1 Sales Award

  • Top Performer




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What to Say on an Appreciation Award?

posted Jan 17, 2014, 5:48 AM by Abdallah Absi

Award Wording
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What to Say on an Appreciation Award


Award

Wording

What to Say on an Appreciation Award?

By Abdallah Absi


Composition of an award

Appreciation awards can be an effective way to say "Thank You" and show someone that you've noticed their hard work. This can be accomplished with the help of a few thoughtful words on an appreciation award. Your choice of words you use to compose your message reflects the award atmosphere.

Some features should always appear on awards such as the recipients name and the date the award is given, but others, such as the message, are left up to interpretation depending on the award.

If you follow some basics listed below, the task of composing a concise and meaningful message is not all that hard.

The W’s of an award

The W’s of an award: What, Who, Why, When, and  Where is an easy formula that will help you to remember what elements to include in an award composition.

Your award content can be divided into four sections:

  1. What is the award about or who is presenting the award? (The Award Title).

  2. Who is receiving the award? (The Award Recipient’s Name).

  3. Why is the award recipient is awarded? (The Award Message).

  4. When and Where is the award presented? (The signature).

With this information in hand, a typical award inscription might read:

(The text coloring scheme in the example below is used to show the different parts of the awards content and is used throughout this document for that purpose, it has nothing to do with awards’ layout designs).

Achievement Award

Presented To

John Smith

In Recognition and Appreciation of Your

Ten Years of Tireless and Dedicated Service

To The Department

(Company Name)
August 23, 2009
.

The Award Title

The award title is usually engraved at the top of the award, it is the award headline, it can be either the name of the award such as: “Achievement Award” or the name of the awarding organization such as: “University of California” or a combination of both such as: “XYZ Paints Co. Employee of the Month Award”.

If the name of the award is chosen as an award title then you can use titles like:

  • “Leadership Award”,

  • “For Outstanding Service””,

  • “Outstanding Achievement Award”

  • “Award of Excellence”

  • More examples

such titles let anyone who sees the award know what the person is being recognized for in general leaving the specifics to “The Award Message” section.

In this case the name of the awarding organization is implied in “The Signature” section at the bottom or by having a company logo on the certificate.

Alternatively if the name of the awarding organization is chosen as an award title (use only if the awarding organization is not an individual) then you can use titles like:

  • “Oregon Credit Services”

  • “Beirut City Fire Department”.

The Presentation Line

This is a short line of text, it follows the title and may say:

  • Presented to

  • is awarded to

  • is hereby presented to

or some other variation

The presentation line can be skipped.

In some cases the award text starts with an expression or word like: “Recognizing”, in such cases the presentation line is not used.

The Award Recipient’s Name

This is simply the name of the person, persons, or group receiving the award.

Awards should have the recipient’s full name on them. In some cases the recipient’s official title/office is also included. However, the recipient’s name on the award can vary depending on the occasion it is given for.

The following paragraph states recommendations from “Honor and Respect - The official guide to names, titles and forms of address”

The basic way to write a name on an award is just to list the recipient full name. Don't include an honorific such as Mr./Mrs./Ms./Dr. it emphasizes that the award is for them without reference to any office or position they might have held.

When you include other information -- honors, academic post-nominal abbreviations, courtesy titles, and personal ranks -- it shifts the emphasis to their role / professional activities. e.g.

  • Vincent Esposito, MD

  • The Reverend John Magisano

  • The Honorable Albert Arnold Gore, Jr.

  • Major General Jeffrey Buchanan

  • Sir Edmund Percival Hillary

For office awards, put the name that a person goes by around the office. For example, if a person’s name is Robert, but he goes by Bob, you should put Bob on the award.

If the award is for a fun occasion between friends or a sports team, you can put a nickname on the trophy. For example, if someone’s name is Jane Smith, but her nickname on the team is “the Jet,” you can put the name as Jane Smith “the Jet” on the trophy.

In some cases the recipient's name font size is made to stand out as much as or even more than the title.

Double-check that you have the correct wording and spelling of the recipient's name and, if applicable, his official title. Read more.

.

The Award Message

The award message can be as generic or as personal as you like. You can compose this section by answering this question: Why the award recipient is awarded?

The reason for the award must be explained here. This could be a simple statement such as: “Best in sales for the year” or a lengthier paragraph outlining specific characteristics or achievements of the award recipient.

Here are some example statements:

  • “In Recognition of Your Loyalty & Dedication”,

  • “Best in Sales for the Year”

Consider using tried and true phrasings that will show the formality of the gift, as well as your appreciation. For example:

  • Your unparalleled performance

  • Your efforts are an inspiration to us all

  • We could not have done it without you

However, do not be afraid to put the message in your own words to give it a personal touch. Read more.

Steer away from using jargon or acronyms that are not commonly used in the English language. Avoid using “puffed up” words that seem phony. Use simple, everyday words that convey sincere thoughts.

Awards do not have much room to write messages, so make the most of the room that you have and keep the message simple.

The following are seven tips for writing better awards’ messages:

  1. Focus On The Relevant Message

  2. Strike The Appropriate Tone

  3. Be Accurate

  4. Understand Space Limitations

  5. Avoid Redundancy and Verbosity

  6. Give Your Logo Prominence

  7. Use Quotations Carefully

The Signature

The signature section includes the award date but may include the name of the person or group  awarding the award if applicable. Sometimes you may want to include two signatories, such as the company president and the recipient's immediate supervisor

Decide how the date of the award should appear on the plaque. Is the date for an accomplishment that took place on a certain date or is it for cumulative achievements made during a month or a year? Should you record the date of the accomplishment or the date the award was given or both?

If printing the full date, consider the range of formats:

  • February 15, 2013

  • Feb. 15, 2013

  • 2/15/2013

  • 2.15.2013

  • February 2013

  • Feb. 2013

  • 02/2013

  • or simply 2013

For consistency purposes, if applicable, look at how dates are typically printed on awards in your organization. Read more.

Proofread

Proofread your text before getting the plaque engraved. Nothing takes the satisfaction out of receiving an appreciation plaque more than noticing that your name is spelled wrong, or some other information is incorrect. Check and double-check your spelling, and check your records to verify the accuracy of what you are saying on the plaque. Read more


Sample Awards Wording

1.0 General Purpose

1.1

Outstanding Achievement Award

Presented to

John Smith

For Your

Positive Accomplishments And

Attitude Towards Our Club

(Company Name)
(Date)

1.2

Outstanding Achievement Award

Presented to

John Smith

For Your

Dedicated Service And Efforts

Where They Counted Most

(Company Name)
(Date)
1.3

Achievement Award

Presented to

John Smith

Best in Sales for the Year

(Company Name)
(Date)


1.4

Achievement Award

Presented to

John Smith

Treasurer
In Recognition of

Exceptional Accomplishments

(Company Name)
(Date)


1.5

Award of Excellence

Presented To

John Smith

(Company Name)
(Date)

1.6

Top Quality Award

Presented to

North Bend

Production Line #1

In Recognition of

Your Outstanding

4th Quarter

(year)


1.7

QUALITY AWARD

Presented to

JOHN SMITH

In Recognition of

Your Total

Commitment to Quality

DELCO AUTO PARTS
(Date)


1.8

Oregon Credit Services

Awarded For

Excellence

To

John Smith

President
Branch Office #14, (Date)

1.9
Presented To

John Smith

In Appreciation for

Outstanding Dedication and Service

Above and Beyond the Call of Duty

The Law Offices of
Kathy Jones
(Date)


1.10

TEAMWORK AWARD

Presented to

John Smith

(Company)
(Date)

1.11

PAST PRESIDENT AWARD

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

In Appreciation for

5 years of

Loyal & Dedicated Leadership

(Organization Name)
(Date)


2.0 Service / Appreciation

2.1

Outstanding Service Award

Presented To

John Smith

In Grateful Appreciation of

Your 25 Years of

Outstanding Service and Dedication

(Company Name)
(year - year)


2.2
Presented To

John Smith

TRUSTEE

In Grateful Appreciation

For Your Years of Outstanding

Service and Devotion

(company name)
(year)


2.3
Presented To

John Smith

In Grateful Appreciation For

Your Many Years of

Dedication and Diligence

To

The Software Documentation Department

(company Name)
(Date)
2.4

John Smith

For Your

Service And Dedication

To
(company name)
(year)


2.5

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Presented To

JOHN SMITH

For Your

Extraordinary Service and

Dedication

To Your Profession

(company name)
(year)


2.6

(Company Name)

25 Years

of Dedicated Service

John Smith

From The Smallest Project

To The Largest Undertaking

You Were Always There To

See It Through

(Date)
.
2.7

OUTSTANDING EMPLOYEE SERVICE AWARD

Presented To

John Smith

In Appreciation For

Your Dedication and Devotion To

The Principles and Ideals of Our Company

(company name)
(year)


2.8

Community Service Award

Presented to

John Smith

In grateful appreciation for your

outstanding dedicated service

to the people in your community.

(Company Name)
(Date)


2.9
Presented To

John Smith

In Appreciation for

Outstanding Dedication and

Service Above and Beyond the Call of Duty

The Law Offices of
Jane Jones
(Date)


.

2.10

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

For your generous commitment

of time, support & inspiration

to our

(ORGANIZATION)

(Date)

2.11

SERVICE AWARD

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

In Appreciation for

15 years of

Loyal & Dedicated Service

(Company Name)
(Date)

Distinguished Service Award

Presented To

(Recipient Name)

In Recognition of

Exceptional Leadership

and Devoted Service


(ORGANIZATION NAME)
(Date)

3.0 Sales

3.1

Outstanding Producer Of The Year

Presented To

John Smith

In Recognition of

Your Ability to Far Surpass

All Sales Quotas Set By the Experts

(company name)
(year)


3.2

Sales Achievement Award

$350,000.00

2nd QUARTER SALES

JOHN SMITH

(company name)
(year)

3.3

SALES - ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Presented To

John Smith

For

Your Outstanding Achievements

In The Field Of Sales

In Your Territory

(company name)
(year)

3.4
Presented To

John Smith

$1,000,000.00 Club

For Outstanding Sales

In the Month Of

February 2000

Captive Mortgage Company


3.5
Presented To

JOHN SMITH

In Recognition of Your

Outstanding Sales in The Region

(company name)
(year)


3.6

Customer Appreciation Award

Thank you for your outstanding

commitment to our customers

(Recipient Name)

(Company Name)
(Date)

3.7

SALES ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Presented To

(Recipient Name)

For Quarterly Sales Exceeding

$250,000

(Organization Name)
(Date)

4.0 Leadership

Management and leadership awards may be named after an important individual in the organization's past, such as a favorite past Board Member, Founder and President. The award may also focus on a particular skill set such as new product introduction, mentoring, strategy, or new market penetration.  It can also focus on the company values, and be awarded to the individuals that best embody these values, such as diversity,excellence, respect, or innovation.

Many of these awards are tied to a favorite saying of the leader or manager, or a reference to a particular success under their management. Successful completion of an acquisition, mergers, divestitures, product launches, attainment of a new revenue level, reaching a particular level of production, successful reorganizations, patent achievement, and more are all commonly given management and leadership awards.

It is also common to recognize executive level leaders with gifts or special awards when they are moving into a new position, leaving the company, or retiring.

4.1
Presented To

John Smith

With Deep Appreciation

For Your Visionary Guidance

And Undaunting Leadership

as

Chairperson of the Board

(Organization Name)
(year)


4.2

Outstanding Leadership Award

Presented To

John Smith

In Appreciation of

Outstanding Leadership

as

Production Manager

(company name)
(year)




4.3

Outstanding Leadership Award

Presented To

John Smith

In Grateful Appreciation

For Your

Superior Leadership Qualities

And Dedication to Our Company

(company name)
(year)


4.4
Presented To

John Smith

Board Secretary

In Grateful Appreciation

For Your Years of

Outstanding Leadership and Devotion

(company name)
(year)


4.5

Leadership Award

Presented to

John Smith

In Recognition Of

Your Ability to Help and Guide

Your Fellow Workers

(company)
(year)


.

4.6

Leadership Award

Presented to

John Smith

In Grateful Appreciation

For Your

Outstanding Leadership Qualities

(company name)
(year)


4.7

TOP - CORPORATE HONORS

Awarded to

John Smith

In Recognition of Your

Superior Performance

In Running Your Department

To Its Fullest Potential

(company name)
(year)


4.8
Presented To

John Smith

Production Supervisor

For Outstanding Leadership

And Superior Performance

(company name)
May, 2004

.

4.9
Presented To

John Smith

In Recognition For

A Record of

Outstanding Accomplishments

(company name)
(year)


4.10
Presented To

John Smith

President
In Recognition of Your

Most Successful Term of Office

(company name)
(year)


4.11

Oregon State

Chapter NWHA

Presented To

John Smith

In Recognition of Your

Performance

In the Office of The President

(year)


.

4.12
Presented To

John Smith

In Grateful Appreciation

For Your

Outstanding Service

And Leadership

(company name)
(year)

4.13
Presented To

John Smith

For Outstanding Leadership

in Preparing Teachers of

Students with Special Needs

DIRECTOR
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
College of Education and Human Services
University of North Florida
(date)


4.14
Presented in Recognition to

John Smith

For Your

Exemplary Leadership and

Selfless acts of Time and Dedication.

Your attention to detail and outstanding

work ethics, have driven this organization

to a level that has prospered.

This plaque is awarded on this (day of Month Year)
4.15

LEADERSHIP AWARD

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

For Outstanding Vision,

Dedication &

Commitment to Excellence

(Company)
(Date)

4.16

Civic Leader Award

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

For your generous commitment

of time, support & inspiration to

our endeavors.

(Organization)
(Date)


4.17

Leadership Award

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

For his/her dedicated

service and commitment

to excellence

(Organization)
(Date)

.

4.18

(Company Name)

(Number) Years

Of Dedicated Service

From the Smallest Project

To the Largest Undertaking

You Always Gave 110%

(Recipient Name)

(Date)

4.19

In Recognition Of

(Recipient Name)

(Title)

In Appreciation For

Your (Number) Years of

Outstanding Leadership

And Guidance

(Company Name)
(Date)

4.20

(Company Name)

Recognizing

(Recipient Name)

(Title)

Your Outstanding

Dedication and Leadership

Have Been Truly Appreciated

By The Entire Organization

(Date)


4.21

(Company Name)

Presented To

(Recipient Name)

With Deep Appreciation

For Your Visionary Guidance

And Unwavering Leadership

As

Chairman of the Board

(Date Range)

4.22

(Company Name)

Global Vision Award

Presented To

(Recipient Name)

(Title)

Recognizing Your

Outstanding Achievements

Leading the

(Department Name) Department

(Date)

4.23

(Company Name)

Outstanding Achievement Award

(Year)

Recognizing

(Recipient Name)

For your Extraordinary Service and

Dedication To Your Team’s Success


4.24

(Company Name)

Outstanding Leadership Award

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

Recognizing Your

Stellar Accomplishments

As Sales Manager

(Date)

4.25
Presented to

(Recipient Name)

(Date/Year)

In Grateful Appreciation

For Your

Dedication and Commitment

To Leading our Company

To New Levels of Success

(Company Name)


4.26
(Company Name)

Award of Excellence

Presented To

(Recipient Name)

Title

For Your Exemplary Leadership And Vision.

Our Organization has Prospered under Your Guidance.

(Date Range)

4.27

(Organization Name)

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

In Recognition of Your Service to

Our Organization as

(Title)

(Date Range)

4.28
(Organization Name)

Outstanding Leadership Award

Presented To

(Recipient Name)

(Date)

Recognizing Stellar

Performance and Dedication


5.0 Retirement

A retirement award conveys respect, appreciation, esteem and the value that an employee had within the company.

Often times, the retirement award will be presented at an employee meeting, special luncheon, or retirement party.

It is a good practice if the company decide to have a commemorative plaque made with the individuals work accomplishments made to hang in a Hall of Fame at the corporate office, showing customers, vendors, and new employees how much they value long term employees.

To choose an appropriate award for a retired employee, you may want to consider: The personality of the individual, the type of position, the number of years worked and the type of company.


5.1
This Award is Presented In

Appreciation for 25 Years Of

Untiring Service

Your Loyalty And Friendship

Will Be Long Remembered

(company name)
(date)


5.2

25 Years

Of Dedicated Service

John Smith

From The Smallest Project

To The Largest Undertaking

You Were Always There

To See It Through

Enjoy Your Well Deserved

Retirement

You Have Earned It!

(company name)
(date)

5.3

HAPPY RETIREMENT

JOHN SMITH

From Your Friends At

Crossroads Travel Agency

(date)


5.4

(ORGANIZATION)

Presented to you for your

dedication and loyalty

15 Years

(Recipient Name)

(Date)

5.5

In appreciation

for your

years of dedicated service

and outstanding accomplishments

(Recipient Name)

(Company Name)
(Date)


.

5.6
Presented to

(Recipient Name)

In Grateful Appreciation

For your Years of

Hard Work, Loyalty, and Leadership

Enjoy your Retirement

(Company Name)
(Year)


5.7

(Recipient Name)

Enjoy your Well Deserved

Retirement

You Have Earned It!

(Company Name)
(Date)

5.8

Retirement Award

Presented to

Name

Thank you for your

Loyalty, Friendship, and Service

You will be Long Remembered

(Company Name)
(Date)


.

5.9

Happy Retirement

From All of Us

At

(Company)

(Date)


5.10

Recognizing

(Recipient Name)

For (Number) Years

At Company Name

You Are One in A Million.

You Will be Greatly Missed.

(Date)

5.11

In Grateful Recognition

Of  (Number) Years

At

(Company Name)

Wishing

(Recipient Name)

Many

New Adventures

(Date)


.


5.12
Presented to

(Recipient Name)

You Have Been An

Outstanding Team Member

And Extraordinary Friend

Our Best Wishes on

Your Retirement

(Company Name)
(Date)

5.13

Recognizing

(Recipient Name)

Thank You for

(Number) Years of Faithful Service

To

(Company Name)

Now you’ll get to

“work” on your golf game!

Enjoy!

(Date)


.

5.14

For

(Recipient Name)

On Your Retirement

(Date)

Thank You for Your

(Number) Years of Dedication.

Enjoy Your Upcoming

Adventures.


5.15

Recognizing

Recipient Name

On your Retirement

After (Number) Years

With Company Name

You Will Be Missed!

(Date)

.


6.0 Public Service / Contribution

6.1

Safety Award

Presented to

Rolling Mill No.5

This Award is Presented On Behalf of U.S. Steel
In Appreciation For

An Accident Free Year

U.S. Steel (year)

6.2

Safety Award

Presented to

James Motor Co.

This Award is Presented On Behalf Of
The National Safety Council

For An Outstanding

Safety Record

(year)


6.3

SAFETY AWARD

to

REFINERY #20

Goshen, Oregon

NO LOST TIME ACCIDENTS

(year)




.
6.4

(Organization Name)

Presented to

(Recipient Name)

For your generous donations,

time and continuous support

(Date)

6.5

Award of Excellence

Honoring the few who

gave their time and love

to those in need.

(Recipient Name)

(Organization Name)
(Date)

6.6

(Organization Name)

VOLUNTEER OF THE MONTH

Congratulations to

(Recipient Name)

(Title)

In recognition of your

exceptional performance

(Date)


.
6.7
Appreciation Award
Presented to

(Recipient Name)

(Organization Name)

IN RECOGNITION OF

VALUED PARTICIPATION AT

(Organization Name)

(Event)

(date)

.

7.0 Sports / Coaching

7.1

Thanks Coach!

For spending your free time with us,

teaching us, inspiring us, encouraging us,

challenging us.

This was a great season thanks to

your dedication and patience!

Presented To

John Smith

From

Team Name

(Year)


7.2

A hundred years from now,

it will not matter the house you lived in,

what kind of car you drove or

what was in your bank account.

But the world might be a better place because

you were important in the life of a child

Thanks Coach

John Smith

From
(Team Name)
(Year)



.

7.3

MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

Tiger Football

John Smith

Quarterback

Congratulations

for a job well done!

(Date)

7.4

With love to

(Recipient Name)

Coach

(Team Name)

For all your time,

trouble and patience –

and for the hugs we so often needed!

Thank You!

(Date)

7.5
Coach

(Recipient Name)

Titan Football

Your determination to succeed,

underscored by your confidence

in us has brought us to a

triumphal winning season!

Many thanks from your team

(Year)

.

8.0 More Examples

8.1

Million Dollar Club

(Recipient Name)

(Date)

8.2

Award of Excellence

Honoring

(Recipient Name)

(Company name)
(date)

8.3

(Organization Name)

Honoring you for your

Talent and Vision

(Recipient Name)

(Date)

8.4

Award of Merit

Recognizing

(Recipient Name)

(Company name)
(date)




3D Bas-Relief Medals

posted Jan 8, 2014, 12:38 AM by Abdallah Absi

December 2013 - Recycled Papers from Absi Co



3D Bas-Relief Medals

Table of Contents




3D Bas-Relief Medals

Table of Contents

What are 3D medals?

3D Artwork

The Stamping Die

Classical Approach Of Producing the Stamping Die

The work of Mr. Mohammed Taufic Absi

Modern Approach Of Producing the Stamping Die

Finishing the Stamping Die

Stamping Dies for Proof-Like Medals

Sample Images of Stamping Dies

Minting or Stamping medals

Sample Images of Bas-Relief Medals

Conclusion


What are 3D medals?

3D (3 Dimensional, 3D Relief or bas-relief) medals are medals with bas-relief carvings. Bas-relief is a kind of sculpture in which shapes are carved so that they are only slightly higher than the flat background and no part of the modeled form is undercut. The projecting image in bas-relief sculptures has a shallow overall depth (1 to 5 scale), as on coins, on which all images are in low relief. In the lowest reliefs the relative depth of the elements shown is completely distorted, and if seen from the side the image makes no sense, but from the front the small variations in depth register as a three-dimensional image. More about bas-relief here.


.

3D Artwork

Your unique vision of how your medal will look like is expressed by our graphic designers. A detailed design reflecting the central theme of your message is further developed  from rough hand sketches using graphic software applications. A sculptor uses these designs to produce a first enlarged (3 times the size of the end product) model sculpt in clay using fine cutting and grating tools (view a video about sculpting a bas-relief here).  Alternatively, a virtual model can be created using CAD/CAM software. A combination of both techniques, sculpting and utilizing CAD/CAM softwares, is especially used for human faces.  First the sculptor uses conventional tools to produce a bas-relief model, then a CAD/CAM specialist uses a digital 3D scanner to capture the sculpted model and transform it into a 3D virtual model. The 3D model can be edited (manipulated digitally) e.g. scaled up or down or enhanced etc.


*

Enlarged model sculpt in clay

*

The enlarged plaster model is cast from the clay model which in turn is used to cast the brass model to be used on a Janvier’s Pantograph machine to engrave a reduced image on a steel die which is finally used after hardening to stamp the impression on brass blanks producing bas-relief medals

* *
*

A steel die with an impression engraved on it’s surface, this must be hardened to be ready for stamping medals.

*

A medal is produced by striking the steel die against a blank brass (copper, silver or gold) disk.


The Stamping Die

To stamp a 3D impression (the bas-relief) on medals you need a steel stamping die. There are several ways to produce steel stamping dies.

Classical Approach Of Producing the Stamping Die

Classically the 3D clay model created by the sculptor will be cast in brass and reduced to the proper size on a steel die using a manual pantograph or an automatic special 3D reducing machine called Janvier’s Pantograph or Medallion Lathe. After engraving the impression on the steel die it is hardened to make it ready for stamping medals.


The work of Mr. Mohammed Taufic Absi

Mr. Mohammed Toufic Absi was the first one to introduce a Janvier’s Pantograph to Lebanon and to use it in the early seventies. He developed his own pioneering approach to produce his stamping dies: instead of using the Janvier’s Pantograph to engrave the steel die, he used it to engrave a copper plate - a metal softer than steel, a good conductor and offers a very good resistivity to electric erosion- that is used in turn as an anode (or Medal “Master”) in a spark erosion machine known as well as electric discharge machine (EDM) to transfer the impression to a steel die (or “Workpiece”). This approach is not only faster in producing detailed engravings but it has also enabled Mr. Absi to recycle hardened stamping dies when the impression engraved on their surface is of no use. Clearly, hardened steel dies are not suitable for engraving by the Janvier’s Pantograph due to the hardness they acquire through the annealing process. The surface of a steel die is cleared from any impression using a surface grinding machine, then a new impression is engraved on its surface using the EDM machine through the copper plate engraved using the Janvier’s Pantograph.


*

A Janvier’s Pantograph machine used to engrave a reduced image on a steel die or a copper plate. The impression is reduced from the brass cast to the right to the small copper plate to the left  in contoured multi-level relief

*

Surface grinding machine used to clear the impression from a steel die enabling the reuse of a hardened steel die

*

EDM machine used to copy an impression from a “Master” copper plate to a “workpiece” or the steel die


Master at top (copper piece), medal die workpiece at bottom, oil jets at left




Modern Approach Of Producing the Stamping Die

A virtual model created using CAD/CAM software can be utilised to engrave the stamping die in contoured multi-level relief using CAM engravers.



A virtual bas-relief is created based on a simple 2D illustration using 3D software

*

A rendered image of the virtual bas-relief to the left: 3D software offers many tools to edit the model and visualise it

*

The same model engraved using a small size CNC on a wax plate as a prototype.

*

The final medal.

*

A virtual bas-relief is created using 3D software based on a simple 2D illustration  of an Arabic calligraphy.

*

.

Finishing the Stamping Die

The die goes through several procedures before it can be used for stamping or coining. It may need to be turned off to be accommodated in the minting collar and minting press. The die is heat-treated to harden it. The exact optimum degree of hardness must be achieved in order to avoid cracking the die under strong pressure while striking.  The die surface may need to be smoothed in case a proof-like medal is to be stamped.


Stamping Dies for Proof-Like Medals

The impressions (the raised areas or the relief) of proof-like medals are frosted and their backgrounds (medal field) are shiny or brilliant (mirror-like) with minor imperfections. The surface of stamping dies used to stamp proof-like medals must be processed in such a way it is highly polished; also the blanks used for minting must be polished.


Sample Images of Stamping Dies


* *
*


Minting or Stamping medals

Read information about minting medals here.

View a video about minting medals here.

Sample Images of Bas-Relief Medals

* *
* *

Conclusion

Production of 3D bas-relief medals involves art and technology.  Though the process can be time consuming and relatively expensive, the 3D bas-relief medals always stands as an aesthetically appealing product.

So, if you are ahead of time, not so tight on budget, and you require medals in large quantities then this might be the option that you are looking for..


To view an updated printable version of this article click here.

Medals' Display Cases

posted Sep 10, 2013, 4:13 AM by Abdallah Absi

Medals' Display Cases

White Papers Series

Display your medal with style in a meticulously crafted and finished presentation case. The case adds prestige and authority to the medal while simultaneously providing its recipient means to protect his or her prize, store it easily, and transport it safely. You can choose from a number of off the shelf items, and we excel at customizing a display case to match your medal. View the White Paper version of this article.




Coin Box

Airtight Coin Capsules

Airtight direct fit medal or coin capsules are made of acrylic, they are hard, crystal clear, and consist of two pieces: cover and base that snap together providing superior long-term protection for your medals or coin collection.
These coin capsules are produced in several sizes to fit the following medal diameters: 35, 40, 50, 60 and 70 mm.


Medals In A Plastic Box

Budget Medal Case

Elegant but economical. The Budget Medal Case is a great way to present the medal to its recipient, the tray which holds the medal can be tilted for display or folds flat to allow the case to be closed for storage or transport. The case size is: 122 x 85 x 17 mm.



Deluxe Box

Deluxe Wooden Case 

Sized for up to 80 mm medals. This case is 117 x 117 x 43 mm and is made from beech wood or mapleThe rich color and elegant finish make it an excellent choice to proudly display your medal and to store it as well. The tray which holds the medal has a tilted position for display or folds flat to allow the box to be closed for storage or transport. The case interior and the tray are covered with velvet. You can choose the interior color to be: dark red, dark blue or dark green. The case is boxed in an assorted color carton box which can be further customized for your event through foil stamping the outside cover with your logo or message.

Personalized Deluxe Box

Personalized Deluxe Wooden Case.

Same as the Deluxe Wooden Case but accommodates a 70 x 25 mm engraved brass plaque finished to suit the selected medal finishing and used to personalize this prize. Case size is 155 x 187 x 43 mm.



Fantasy Box

Fantasy Wooden Case

The Fantazy Wooden Case is an excellent choice to proudly display your medal, protect it and store it as well.Your medal is protected in an Airtight Coin Capsule and is presented in a wooden case. The tray which holds the medal has a tilted position for display and folds flat for storage or transport.This case can accommodate your business card or gift card nicely inside; it is also suitable to display double sided medals. The case size is: 125 x 105 x 30 mm. The case is boxed in an assorted color carton box which can be further customized for your event through foil stamping the outside cover with your logo or message.

Personalized Fantasy Box

Personalized Fantasy Wooden Case

Same as the Fantazy Wooden case but accommodates a 70 x 25 mm engraved brass plaque finished to suit the selected medal finishing and used to personalize this prize. Case size is 135 x 135 x 30 mm.


Luxury Box

Luxury Wooden Case

This glass-polished bordeaux-colored wooden case is distinguished by a rich color, elegant finish and a wide display area, these features make it an excellent choice to proudly display your medal and to store it as well. The Case size is 180 x 160 x 28 mm. The case is boxed in an assorted color carton box which can be further customized for your event through foil stamping the outside cover with your logo or message. This case can accommodate medals of different diameters starting from 50 up to 100 mm in addition to a personalization plate.

A Guide to Medals' Types

posted Aug 28, 2013, 2:48 AM by Abdallah Absi

The following is a table of images prepared especially to display different types of medals, each has its own specifications, by viewing these images next to each other you will be able to understand medals' specifications and their significance better leading a better decision regarding choosing the medal that you want.
  • Hover the  cursor over a medal image to read its specifications.
  • Click on an image to view an enlarged version.
  • To view the images in a photo album format click here.


Brass

Copper 1

Copper 2

Copper 3

Bronze 1

Bronze 2

Bronze 3

Bronze 4

Bronze 5

Bronze 6

Bronze 7

Bronze 8

Bronze 9

Bronze 10

Bronze 11

Silver 1

Silver 2

Silver 3

Silver 4

Silver 5

Silver 6

Silver 7

Silver 8

Silver 9

Silver 10

Silver 11

Silver 12

Gold 1

Gold 2

Gold 3

Gold 4

Gold 5

Gold 6


Gold 7

Gold 8

1-10 of 14